The 'Dead Lens' Project

 

 

 

Low cost adapter rings for classic lenses on mirrorless digital.

 

Adapting Old Lenses to Mirrorless Cameras

The new compact, mirrorless cameras have opened up a world of fun with old lenses. Up until now, people with Canons and some other bodies have been mounting high quality heritage lenses. Companies like Zeiss and Voigtlander have been making rather expensive and very high quality manual prime lenses. People are now paying high prices for quite basic old manual lenses to mount on a mirrorless - to the point where ebay is now littered with attempts to sell near worthless, film SLR bodies from which the standard 50mm lenses have been scavenged. But I think most of them have been missing the point. Sharpness may not be the only criterion – what about art and special effects? A few have tried pinhole lenses or Holga and other plastic specials to do ‘Lomography’ but again, why? That style should be done with film – digital is too easy. If I want those effects in digital, I can do it in Lightroom!

And then there are crappy old lenses (and many quite good ones too) that came with a cheap SLR or were bought cheap out of magazines forty years ago to fit one.   They didn’t cost much and were sold to amateurs who couldn't afford much.  Some were reasonable quality but were small apertured or a bit crude or had some distortion or were soft in the corners or…whatever. Now there are adapters to put them on just about anything so we can have a bit of fun.

I’m talking here about basic lenses that can be bought for a few dollars. In most cases they are not worth repairing. They may produce soft, low contrast, hazy images, smeary coloured, blurred with light flare and colour fringing – or lovely, soft, artistic, painterly images. It depends on luck and the way that you see them. If you can let go of the need to be sharp, for instance, you can use them. There is a reason why Lomography uses horrid little plastic lenses. 

A cheap and basic Meyer-Optik Domiplan 50mm f/2.8 (Tessar) on my OM-D EM-1.

 

Fun Lenses. I find them, clean them, shoot with them for fun and then offer them for sale with or without an adapter and perhaps with macro tubes, hood,  or interesting filters if that works and with a few ideas on how best to use them – to take advantage of their flaws sometimes.  Everything from old Eat German screw mount lenses for a few dollares to an incredibly rare Leitz Thambar for a few thousand! They come with a full description of their faults, difficulties, deficiencies, good points and suggestions for best use. I guarantee that I’ve shot with every one, to test it at least, on a micro Four Thirds body (Oly E-M1) or a Leica digital full frame. Or a Nikon 1 or an NEX if they were available – whichever I though most appropriate. Images are attached to auctions.

I started this project with a few old lenses I had lying around. Some were awful, or challenged in some way or just plain broken. But all were usable. An old T mount 135mm with a jammed aperture diaphragm. Jam it wide open and use it as a portrait lens – if it isn’t very sharp, even better. (That one became a favourite of mine for quite a while). I used to work in advertising and my motto there was that ‘if the product has a flaw, make it a feature’. On the same principle, a lens that has scratches and fungus should be regarded as ‘special’ in some way.

So if you fancy a bit of fun wit an old lens on your spiffy, new digital, why not try these. It doesn't amtter if you have a low-cost compact like a Nikon J1 or Olympus E-PM or if you have a wallet crushing Leica M - so long as you have Live View and focus aids like magnification and/or focus peaking, it works.

 

TECHNICAL NOTES

I wrote this originally before the appearance of full frame mirrorless digital cameras such as the Sony a7 series. Only the Leica M9-M240 was available and Leica users tend to turn their noses up at lesser quality lenses. So this tends to assume a crop factor - usually 1.5x (1.6x for Canon EOS, 1.3x for a Canon 1D) and 2x for Olympus/Panasonic mFT. There have been exceptions such as even smaller sensors units - Pentax Q and Nikon One for instance, but these have not been particularly successful. Generally the advice is unchanged but Sony users have been particularly enthusiastic users of heritage lenses. They can also use old Minolta autofocus lenses with an adapter and save a fortune on new Sony lenses! The advantage of full frame is that wide lenses are now worthwhile, especially down in the 21mm and 24mm true landscape category or ultrawide and fisheye lenses.

Focal Length

A standard old 50mm f2 SLR lens becomes a 75mm on an NEX, Samsung, or Fujifilm; 100mm on an Olympus or Panasonic mirrorless body; 135mm on a Nikon 1; a great fast portrait lens on any of them. What is more a lot of these lenses were often reasonably sharp in the middle but softer around the edges of the image - in the corners. It’s expensive to design a lens that is sharp edge to edge and for a portrait, often unnecessary. But when you mount them on a reduced format mirrorless, you are cropping them down to the ‘sweet spot’, the sharper central zone and they can perform surprisingly well. A good quality manual lens like an Olympus or Pentax wide or standard but with a little fungus around the edges or a scratch or two on the front will deliver crisp and sharp images on a new mirrorless digital. I’ve tested this theory and discovered that most so called faults have almost no effect. (See below). A regular customer of mine shoots an 'undistinguished' 50mm f2 Cosina lens on his Fujifilm X digital. He got it foe $10 off a market stall. It shoots dark, crisp, hgh contrast black and white images and that suits his style perfectly. It has become his signature lens! Best ten bucks he ever spent.

Telephoto gets even more interesting than a fast ‘50mm’ portrait length. A 135mm f3.5 was a bit ordinary in the day but when it becomes a 270 f/3.5 on a micro Four Thirds body, that’s very useful. And a 200mm f/4 is now a light-sucking 400mm f/4.  On a Pentax Q a 50mm becomes a 280mm telephoto (or 235mm on later models) which is extreme – a tiny, low cost, stabilised super-telephoto. I have a lot of old 70-210mm zooms (or thereabouts ) which don't sell well for some reason - some are cheap off brand, others good quality. On a mirrorless they can be around 105mm - 320mm or 140mm-330mm or better - that's really usefull and they're cheap!

Tamron 500mm f/8 SP Mirror Lens - 1000mm effective


Old Macro lenses are also very good. The smaller sensor gives you a bit more working distance, macro lenses were often very sharp indeed and for most macro subjects, it is actually easier to manual focus rather than let the lens hunt around for ages and make the wrong decisions. So old Tamron and Sigma macro’s, for instance, are very usable indeed for things like flowers and insects. A true macro lens should go to at least 1:2 ratio. The image on the sensor is half  life size. That’s equivalent to 1:1 life size on micro Four Thirds!

 

 

A stock standard 50mm f/1.8 Olympus OM lens mounted on a macro focussing 2x teleconverter and OM to m4/3rds adapter - and with a hood. An effective and quite sharp 200mm f/4 Macro lens.

 

The more expensive macro lenses went to 1:1 on full frame, sometimes by using an extension tube. But be careful – some lenses were labelled ‘macro’ or close up when they only went to 4:1 or 5:1. They were close focussing, not macro. (Actually the term should be ‘micro’ but only Nikon used it – Micro-Nikkor lenses).

Wide angles are less exciting so I tend to avoid them – a 28mm for instance tends to be larger, slower aperture, not as sharp as a 50mm and when it becomes a 40mm-55mm f/3.5 instead, well that’s a bit ho-hum. Big and slow. Unless you like a mid-range prime with a bit of distortion, it’s usually not worth the trouble unless you want to try your hand at Leica style manual focus street shooting with a digital body. About twice a week I get asked for a wide angle to put on a digital - wrong question unless you have a full frame digital camera. I can sell you a nice 24mm Tamron for a couple of hundred but on your Canon D70 it becomes a 38mm! Who cares?! And the last truly wide lens I sold, a Tamron 14mm in Nikon mount, is an awesome lens and was destined for a D4 but on a regular SLR its 21mm, huge and $750 wasted!
   Full Frame note - That is, of course, unless you are using a full frame body such as a Sony a7. Then lenses maintain their original aspect and an old 28mm becomes a useful item! 

 

 

There’s another consideration. Depth of field. These lenses do maintain their original characteristics on the smaller sensor bodies – they’ve only been cropped, not extended. Therefore, a 50mm used as a 75mm wide open has more depth of field than the real thing, which you may prefer, or not. A 200mm cropped to 400mm effective  has the same depth of field and flattening effect of a 200mm, and in this case a wider depth of field may be a advantage - a 400mm wide open has a paper-thin depth of field. Further, the depth of field increases even more with smaller and smaller sensors so while putting a 50mm on a tiny Pentax Q will give you a near 500mm supertelephoto with a very fast aperture, the depth of field will be very wide indeed – you’ll get more ‘apparent’ focus which means more usable images but you may need to be carefully about where the point of critical focus is placed.

Finally, Aperture. I have heard arguments about the effective aperture of a fast lens used on a sensor smaller than full frame. People have assured me that an f2 lens is slower than f2 when used on micro-Four Thirds, for instance and seem to have lovely, elegant, incomprehensible technical arguments to support that assertion. I'm unconvinced. There never seems to be any discussion about a slowing of full frame capable lenses when used on APS-C sensors, for instance - and surely the same rules apply? I prefer a simple, and plausible argument. It goes something like this - Light is evenly distributed across the frame by the lens (slightly brighter in the middle in most cases); the frame is effectively cropped by the smaller sensor; therefore the amount of light or number of photons falling on each individual pixel is the same regardless of sensor real estate - if the lens and aperture setting are the same. An f/2 lens is still an f/2 lens - it is proportionaltly identical. If you have a simple argument that shows my point of view to be wrong, I'd be delighted to hear from you.

 

Damage

Many old lenses show up with damage of various kinds and are often rejected out of hand. Sometimes this is foolish and you could be passing up a bargain. You’ll see people on ebay offering scratched, dusty and fungussed lenses and claiming that, it won’t affect the image. Often they are right but sometimes they are being misleading. Damage to a lens falls into a number of categories and not all of them are terminal. Some are downright interesting.

Mechanical: A lens with a jammed focus ring is useless of course, unless you want to spend $50-100 to get it repaired. It’s like a stopped clock – only in focus at one distance (like the clock is only right twice a day!) But you could use it for macro with extension tubes, focussing by moving the camera in and out! Hard work though and you only get one enlargement ratio.

A broken aperture diaphragm is different. I actually have an old soft focus portrait lens (a Portragon) which has no aperture at all and never did. A friend uses an apertureless Russian ‘Cyclops’ night vision scope lens as a portrait lens. If a lens can be jammed wide open or you can get in there and remove the blades, it’s usable. Portraits are best taken at wide apertures so that the background goes out of focus and the person ‘pops’ out of the image. Results are variable with non-apertured lenses– it may work well or it may be awful, but it is worth the try. 

Dented front filter rings are common and can be knocked out to roughly round with a light hammer and a wooden peg cut to the curve shape – use it like a chisel and be firm.  I then screw in a step-up ring (often with some effort) to create a new front ring.

Glass:  Scratches, chips and gouges:

The front element often suffers from impact damage in the form of chips and scratches. I had two examples of a standard lens where the earlier built one had a bad, deep scratch on the front element, about 8mm long halfway between the middle and edge.  That’s why I bought another, later one but I was surprised to find that the early, damaged lens was still sharper. The traditional method of dealing with this problem is to fill a scratch with a fine black marker. Then use a lens hood to minimise side light which could reflect in the scratch. This kills any flare effect and the black line will not normally resolve on the image except on a wide angle at small aperture.  Think of mirror lenses with a huge lump in the middle of the front of the lenses - and it does not show. So damage like this is only a problem with very wide angle lenses which may have enough depth of field to resolve the damage at small apertures and you are less likely to be using such a lens on a mirrorless. 35mm focal length and up is normally fine – unless you are using them on a very small sensor like a Pentax Q which has a very broad depth of field.

But…scratches on the rear element are more serious and may make a lens unusable. These will almost always affect the image in some way. And then there are ‘cleaning marks’. These are very fine scratches caused by cleaning a lens with a dirty cloth. They often form circular patterns and can be seen in strong light. Unlike single big scratches, they can cause fogging and softening of the image and reduced contrast. Never clean a lens with anything but a mcrofibre cloth (from an optician or camera store) or something like a Lens Pen.

Fungus: Fungus grows on both toes and lenses. On a lens it takes two forms. The first is like a cobweb, sometimes growing from the side. Often it is in the layer between two glass elements that are glued together. A second form is a whitish spot that grows on a surface. Both are caused by a lens being left in the dark in humid conditions. You can kill it quickly by exposing the lens to strong sunlight (UV) for a few hours but – that doesn’t get rid of the mycelium, the threads which are the body of the fungus. Worse, if the fungus has been there long enough, the acid that it naturally exudes will have etched through the coatings and into the glass. This is irretrievable. Repolishing can be done but is too expensive for all but the most expensive and specialist lenses.

Fortunately, fungus usually attacks from the edges first so a slightly affected lens can be used on a reduced format sensor and the fungussed area will be cropped out. White spots and cobwebs that are in the middle will soften the image, depending on how far back in the lens they are growing. This may mean that you have a dreadful lens – or a lens with a nice, soft effect. That’s the luck of the draw.

Conclusion

So there you go. It’s not about picking up a lens and expecting it to be sharp and giving accurate colour rendition. It’s all about picking up a challenged piece of glass and learning to work within its limits which, if you think about it, it what photography SHOULD be all about. And best of all, the results are unpredictable and possibly unique to each lens. With film, that used to be a problem. With digital cameras, that’s no problem as you now get instant images to check so that you can modify your technique. Sure, if using an old 50mm or 100mm fast prime to get really sharp images is your thing, go ahead. I may even have the lens and adapter for you to do that, cleaned pre-checked and tested with a good adapter. But if you want to have fun – try damaged and dirty and see what you get.

 

Lens Adapters

There are a huge number of adapters available to mount heritage lenses on the new, compact mirrorless cameras. It’s easy to make them as the distance between the sensor and the lens mount is much shorter than on a ‘normal’ SLR – usually around 20mm rather than somewhere between 40-50mm. So the adapter is basically an extension tube with no electrical connections (with a couple of automatic exceptions). As in the 1950’s-60’s, everything is manual apart from the auto exposure.

There were adapter rings before the mirrorless body – some regular full size SLR’s with conventional viewfinders could mount other lenses in the same way. The champion of this was Canon as their EF mount was shorter and wider than most. So you could mount a Nikon lens on a Canon – but not vice versa. You’ll find plenty of adapters for mounting Nikon or Olympus OM lenses on a Canon EOS, T mount adapters for most original SLR mounts and so on. There are even mounts for putting medium format lenses on to 35mm SLR’s, especially useful for using tilt-shift adapters where the extra coverage of the big lens culd be used for side shifting. But compacts like the Olympus mFT mount, the Sony NEX and others made things much easier.

Be aware that there is a huge difference in prices for adapters. You can pay $250-400 for a mount from Germany made by Novoflex, for instance and you’ll get a very well made and precisely machined adapter. Or you can get a good Japanese Kipon or Metabones for around $100 or a Fotodiox brand of the same mount for around $50. (Kipon, Fotodiox and Roxen are good suppliers with wide ranges of adapters). Or then you’ll see the same thing for $10-20 with a name like Fotoga, out of who knows where in China. What’s the difference?

Well the Chinese mount may be cruder in finish, not as precise in measurement and may not fit quite as well – but most of the ones I’ve bought with normal caution have been just fine. I’ve had a couple that were problematic – one was loose and would not lock on to the camera properly; the other was very tight and stiff to mount, hard to remove. In both cases, the seller refunded so there was no harm done. A typical fault with the Fotga grade is that it is a bit loose when mounted and there is a tiny wobble. Not a serious problem but annoying.The Japanese brands are better and more robust – and Kipon has a huge range with some clever tilt and shift models too – but they probably come out of the same factory in China with a bit of extra checking and finishing. The German ones are extremely expensive and probably only worth it if you are using some very expensive lenses and camera bodies. They are guaranteed to be exact, work precisely and do no damage. But…generally, the use of manual focus techniques like magnification and focus peaking means that what you see is what you get, even if the adapter is a bit ‘off’.  You just need to check infinity focus on a distant subject to be sure.

It’s worth mentioning the Tilt/Shift adapters. These either shift the lens sideways, or tilt it in relation to the body, or both. Shift is used for correcting verticals when photographing buildings. Tilt is used for adjusting the field of focus from vertical to an angle. They are a specialised need but fun to explore.

Tamron - Tamron made a range of Adaptall lenses from the 1960's to 1990's. These are manual focus lenses of decent quality with intercghangeable mounts. The mount was complex and tricky to fit as it had mechanisms to transfer the aperture information to the camera.. Typically you didn't swap them around unless you changed your camera system. They are still around and avaiailble for not too much - the 90mm f2.5 Macro is a  particular favorite of mine. But there are now cheap and useful Chinese 'Tamron' adapters which are a good substitute for the original and sometimes scrarce Adaptall adapters. They lack the mechanical aperture conection cams which you no longer need anyway so they make a great alternative.


So what can you mount on an Olympus OM-D or (new) PEN, a Sony NEX or a Fujifilm X body? You’d be surprised! Some of the lenses may be new to you. You can even mount a Sony E (NEX lens or a Fuji X lens on mFT! There are adapters now available for some quite rare lenses too. I made this list up with a quick survey through ebay, looking for the cheapest available adapters. These are the lenses that you can mount at minimal cost. You may ask, why would I bother to mount a Canon EF or Nikon AF lens on to something else? Well, you might if it is a special piece of glass like the Nikon 14-24mm and you want to shoot movies through it. Or if, as I did recently, you have a Lensbaby or similar accessory in EF mount and you want to use it on a mirrorless camera. It's handy then.

Note – in some cases where a mount is not available, it is possible to piggyback two mounts. For instance, to put a Hasselblad medium format lens on a Nikon 1, you could first put the lens on a Hasselblad to Nikon F adapter and then use a Nikon F to Nikon 1 adapter. This tends to work well where there were many previous ‘pre-mirrorless’ mounts available, for Canon EF for instance.

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micro Four Thirds Adapters

for Olympus OM-D and PEN, Panasonic G. D not confuse it with the origina FT mount for Olmpus E digital cameras and a few others - there are a few adapters for this mount but they are less common.

Screw Mounts

M42 Screw Mount - Universal, or ‘Pentax’ 42mm Screw -  $6

M39 Leica Screw Mount - 39mm Screw  - $4

Robot M26 - $54

T/T2 Screw Mount – similar to M42 but a different pitch - $6

C Mount – 16mm Movie Lenses - $3

D Mount – 8mm Movie Lenses - $

Macro Tube Set - $9

Bayonet Mounts

Canon EF (EOS) - $9

Tilt $46.50, Tilt/Shift $125

Canon EF with aperture – $40

Canon FD/FL - $9

Contax-Yashica (C/Y) - $9

Fuji X Fujinon (original 1980’s X mount) - $46

Konica AR - $12

Leica M - $5

Leica R -$15.50   Tilt $46.50

Minolta MC, MD - $9.50

Nikon F - $8  Tilt - $50, Macro $42

Nikon G with aperture - $28

Olympus OM - $9

Olympus 4/3rds - $47 (full auto, MMF copy)

Pentax K - $9

Praktica PB - $20.50

Sony alpha (Minolta AF) - $15

Tamron Adaptall -  $15

Less Common Bayonet Mounts

Alpa – Kipon $100

Argus C3 - $39

Contax G (Zeiss) - $50 – 250 (expensive is MUCH better)

Contax N1 with aperture – Kipon $150

Contax Rangefinder - $24.50

Exakta - $14

Topcon Auto Topcor - $14

Hasselblad - $95

Hasselblad X-pan - $35

Kiev 6, Pentacon 6 (P6) Medium Format - $30

Nikon S Rangefinder - $24.50

Pentax 110 (110 film ‘Super’ SLR system) - $22.50

Rollei Voigtlander QBM SL35 - $24.50

Voigtländer, Braun, Kodak Retina Reflex (DKL) - $61

Zeiss Icarex - $65

 

Sony E-mount Adapters

for Sony NEX bodies (E-mount, not alpha mount)

Best resource for e-mount adapters as of 1 Jan 2017 - http://briansmith.com/gear/sony-lens-adapters/

Screw Mounts

M42 Screw Mount - Universal, or ‘Pentax’ 42mm Screw -  $9

M39 Leica Screw Mount - 39mm Screw  - $4

Robot M26 - $54

T/T2 Screw Mount – similar to M42 but a different pitch - $6

C Mount – 16mm Movie Lenses - $3

Bayonet Mounts

AF Macro Tube Set - $45

Canon EF (EOS) - $9

Canon EF with aperture – $40

Canon EF with AutoFocus –$145 plus

Canon FD/FL - $9

Contax-Yashica (C/Y) - $9

Fuji X Fujinon - $46

Konica AR - $12

Leica M - $5

Leica R -$35

Minolta MC, MD - $16                      

Nikon F - $8  Tilt - $50, Macro $42

Nikon G with aperture - $13

Olympus OM - $9

Olympus 4/3rds - $47 (full auto, MMF copy)Olympus Panasonic micro 43rds $15

Pentax K - $9

Praktica PB - $20.50

Sony alpha A - mount (Minolta AF) – manual - $25

Tamron Adaptall - $15

 Less Common Bayonet Mounts

Alpa – $159

Contax G (Zeiss) - $39 – 250 (expensive is MUCH better)

Contax N1 Electronic - $254 Contax Rangefinder - $24.50

Contax Rangefinder - $24.50

Diax - $98

Exakta - $14

Topcon Auto Topcor - $14

Hasselblad - $95

Hasselblad X-pan - $35

Kiev 6, Pentacon 6 (P6) Medium Format - $40

Nikon S Rangefinder - $30

Mamiya Press - $95

Pentax 110 (110 film ‘Super’ SLR system) - $20

Perfex 44 - $37

PL, K-35 (Movie) – Cooke, Arriflex, Zeiss, Baltar, Angenieux - $200-450

Rollei Voigtlander QBM SL35 - $13

Voigtländer, Braun, Kodak Retina Reflex (DKL) - $61

Zeiss Icarex BM - $48-85

Zeiss Contarex - $64

 

Samsung NX Adapters

Screw Mounts

 M42 Screw Mount - Universal, or ‘Pentax’ 42mm Screw -  $9

 M39 Leica Screw Mount - 39mm Screw  - $5

 Miranda M44 - $25

 Robot M26 - $23

 T/T2 Screw Mount – similar to M42 but a different pitch - $6

 C Mount – 16mm Movie Lenses - $3

 Macro Tube Set - $7

Bayonet Mounts

Canon EF (EOS) - $9

Canon FD/FL - $9

Contax-Yashica (C/Y) - $9

Konica AR - $12

Leica M - ? Use screw to M adapter?

Leica R -$15.50   Tilt $46.50

Minolta MC, MD - $9.50

Nikon AI F - $8   Tilt - $50, Macro $42

Nikon AF-G with aperture control - $18

Olympus OM - $9

Olympus 4/3rds - $47 (full auto, MMF copy)

Pentax K - $9

Pentax DA with aperture control. $18

Sony alpha (Minolta AF) - $35 with diaphragm control, $55

Less Common Bayonet Mounts

Exakta - $14

Topcon Auto Topcor - $14

Kiev 6, Pentacon 6 (P6) Use P6-M42 and then M42-Samsung?

 

Canon EM (EOS-M) Mount

For Canon M bodies

Screw Mounts

M42 Screw Mount - Universal, or ‘Pentax’ 42mm Screw -  $12

M39 Leica Screw Mount - 39mm Screw  - $12

Robot M26 - $35

T/T2 Screw Mount – similar to M42 but a different pitch - $17

C Mount – 16mm Movie Lenses - $7

Kiev 16U Movie  - M32 x 0.5  $56

Macro Tubes - $45

Reversing ring - $5

Bayonet Mounts

Arriflex S  $36    PL - $225 (tilt $285)

Canon EF (EOS) – with full AF & aperture transfer  $32-75

Canon FD/FL - $13

Contax-Yashica (C/Y) - $13

Konica AR - $13

Leica M - $11

Leica R -$13  

Leica Visoflex - $90

Minolta MC, MD - $11

Nikon AI F - $14                                    

Nikon AF-G with aperture control - $17

Olympus OM - $13

Pentax K - $15

Pentax DA with aperture control. $19

Praktica PB - $80

Sony alpha (Minolta AF) - $20

Sigma SA - $26

Tamron Adaptall 2 -  $20

Less Common Bayonet Mounts

Alpa – Kipon $109

Argus C3 - $37

B4 2/3” ‘Broadcast Lens - $150

Contax G (Zeiss) - $30

Contax N1 with aperture – Kipon $119

Exakta - $15

(Topcon Auto Topcor - $15)

Hasselblad - $90

Hasselblad X-pan - $26

Kiev 6, Pentacon 6 (P6) Medium Format - $30

Nikon S Rangefinder - $24.50

Pentax 110 (110 film ‘Super’ SLR system) – Kipon  $60

Rollei Voigtlander QBM SL35 - $49

 

Fuji X Mount

For Fujifilm X and X-Pro bodies

Note that there was an earlier series of X-Fujinon bayonet lenses for Fujica and Fuji SLR’s in the 1980’s and this causes confusion. This is made worse by the common usage of the older Fuji for the present Fujifilm and some are calling the X-mount FX! Worse, the first series of Fujica’s in the 1970’s were M42 screw mount! The original X-bayonet mount is incompatible with the modern X-mount but there are some adapters available to mount them to modern mirrorless cameras.

Screw Mounts

M42 Screw Mount - Universal, or ‘Pentax’ 42mm Screw -  $9

M39 Leica Screw Mount - 39mm Screw  - $14

Robot M26 - $50

T/T2 Screw Mount – similar to M42 but a different pitch - $26

C Mount – 16mm Movie Lenses - $4

Macro Tube Set - $8

Bayonet Mounts

Arriflex S $35  PL $138

Contax Yashica $12

Canon EF $14

Canon FD/FL  $10    (does not suit FL 58mm f1.2)

Konica AR  $12

Leica R   $150 (Rayqual) 

Leica M   $10

Minolta MD/MC  $12

Nikon F   $14 (tilt-shift $235)

Nikon G  $19

Olympus PEN F  $13

Olympus OM  $10

Olympus 4/3  $71

Pentax PK  $14

Pentax 110 - $75

Sony alpha/Minolta AF  $16

Tamron Adaptall II  $14

Less Common Bayonet Mounts

Alpa – $100

Argus C3 - $37

Contax G (Zeiss) - $20 - $129 (Metabones) - $220 (Kipon)

Contax N1 with aperture – Kipon $119

Contax Rangefinder - $80

Exakta - $16

(Topcon Auto Topcor - $15)

Hasselblad - $90

Hasselblad X-pan - $36

Kiev 60 (P6) $26

Nikon S Rangefinder - $28

Rollei Voigtlander QBM SL35 - $15

 

Nikon CX Mount

For Nikon 1 V1, V2, J1…

Screw Mounts

M42 Screw Mount – $14 (Tripod mount $34)

M39 Leica Screw Mount - 39mm Screw  - $12

T (2) Mount  $11

C Mount – 16mm Movie Lenses - $7

Macro Tube Set -    3 tube $59

Bayonet Mounts

Arriflex S $53

Contax Yashica $26 (tripod mount)  $48

Canon EF $14 (with tripod mount - $40)

Canon FD  $49

Leica R   $20  (with tripod mount $40)

Leica M   $17

Minolta MD/MC  $17

Nikon F-AI   $13 (tripod mount $40)

Nikon G  $16 (tripod mount $48)

Nikon AF (FT-1) auto   $240

Olympus PEN F  $35

Olympus OM  $16

Pentax PK  $24

Sony alpha/Minolta AF  $56

Tamron Adaptall II  $18

Less Common Bayonet Mounts

Contax G (Zeiss) - $30 - $60 (Roxen) - $152 (Kipon)

Contax N1 with aperture – Kipon $119

Hasselblad – use Hasselblad V to Nikon F adapter first? $60

Kiev 60 (P6) $26

Rollei Voigtlander QBM SL35 - $15

 

 

Pentax Q Mount

For Pentax Q, Q10, Q7...…

Screw Mounts

M42 Screw Mount – $15 ($22 with tripod mount)

M39 Leica Screw Mount - 39mm Screw  - $12

T (2) Mount  $24

C Mount – 16mm Movie Lenses - $5

D Mount –   8mm Movie Lenses - $5

Macro Tube Set -    3 tube $59

Bayonet Mounts

Arriflex S $30

B4 2/3” Cine - $150

Contax Yashica $21

Contax G (Zeiss) - $34

Canon EF $18

Canon FD  $21

Konica AR - $21

Leica R   $25  (with tripod mount)

Leica M   $17

Minolta MD/MC  $21

Nikon F, F-AI, F-AF  $18

Olympus PEN F  $40

Olympus OM  $23

Pentax K  $18 (Kipon Tilt - $180)

Pentax 110 - $21

Sony alpha/Minolta AF  $22

Tamron Adaptall II  $18